Exercise is incredibly beneficial for people with all sorts of medical conditions. If you have a chronic condition, you are also very likely to be taking a long-term medication. However, did you know that your medications could interact with how you exercise?

EXERCISING WHILE ON ANTIDEPRESSANTS FOR MOOD DISORDERS

Exercise has been widely touted as an effective, natural antidepressant for the treatment of mood disorders like anxiety and depression. However, many antidepressants are associated with weight gain. If you gain weight or have trouble losing weight when you already exercise, this can be quite troubling. This is especially true if your mental health condition is tied to your body image.

As hard as it may be, try to separate your idea of fitness success from losing weight. Instead, focus on mental wellness. Also, do not neglect other treatment options. Listen to your doctor, eat a healthy diet, and do activities you enjoy. And if your weight still troubles you, talk to your doctor about switching medications.

EXERCISING WITH HIGH CHOLESTEROL WHILE ON STATINS

High cholesterol has no symptoms, and people of all ages can have it. People with high cholesterol should take care to treat this condition as it raises their risk of later heart disease. One treatment is exercise. Another treatment is statin medications.

If you take statins and work out, use caution. Over-exerting yourself can cause exertional rhabdomyolysis. Moreover, people who take statins have a higher chance of experiencing this. It’s a condition when skeletal muscle tissue breaks down, releasing cellular substances into the blood, which can harm your kidneys.

If you take statins for high cholesterol, inform your trainer. Start with a low-intensity workout, and build intensity gradually. Do not exercise in excessively hot or humid climates, and keep yourself hydrated. If you use statins, talk to your doctor first before exercising.

EXERCISING WITH A THYROID DISORDER WHILE ON SYNTHROID®

Symptoms of hypothyroidism include fatigue, so staying fit may be an extra challenge for those with hypothyroidism. A medication like Synthroid® (levothyroxine) may help, but getting your dosage correct is key. Too much levothyroxine can give you symptoms of hyperthyroidism, which include heart palpitations and anxiety — not fun when you’re trying to exercise!

If you take Synthroid®, make sure you’re meeting with your doctor regularly and checking your thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. Report any ill effects you suspect are related to your thyroid medication.

EXERCISING WITH BETA BLOCKERS AND HEART CONDITIONS

Beta blockers are commonly prescribed to treat hypertension and heart disease. They can decrease heart rate during exercise and lower blood pressure. Therefore, if you are on beta blockers, you may not be able to hit your target heart rate due to this drug.

You should consider alternative methods for measuring your exertion. Subjective exertion measurement scales may be more appropriate. And if you also have diabetes, don’t forget to check your glucose values often.

Continue exercising, as physical activity is good for heart health. However, do talk to your doctor before starting a new exercising regimen.

EXERCISING WITH INHALERS AND ASTHMA

If you have asthma, you may be rightly concerned about your ability to exercise. But with the correct management, you can enjoy the health benefits of exercise just like everyone else. Asthma medications, like a short-acting beta2-agonist inhaler, can help exercise-induced asthma when taken about 15 minutes before working out. However, if you find yourself using medication a lot during exercise, talk to your doctor. You may require further treatment.

STRESSING LESS ABOUT MEDICATION

If you can relate with one of these chronic conditions, you likely take long-term medications, and the bills can quickly add up. Worry less about money and focus on getting fit by buying medication online. International and Canadian pharmacy referral services like Canada Med Pharmacy offer medications like ADVAIR and LIPITOR® (atorvastatin) from licensed pharmacies at reduced prices. This is thanks to different price regulations in other countries.

STRESSING LESS ABOUT EXERCISE

Drug and exercise interactions may seem scary, but don’t let this fear keep you from getting fit. Exercising is one of the best things you can do you for your body, and as long as you go about it smartly, you should be fine.

If you are worried about how exercise will affect your condition, talk to your doctor before starting a new exercise routine. If you have a personal trainer, inform them of your conditions and medications. If you have a gym buddy, inform them as well. If an emergency happens, they can inform medical professionals on your behalf. If you exercise alone, wear a medical bracelet or another form of medical ID. Lastly, try to enjoy the health benefits of exercise. Not only does fitness make you fit, but it also elevates your mood.

Research for this article can be found at: the National Institutes of Health, the National Health Service, the Psychopharmacology Institute, the American Council on Exercise, and MedlinePlus.

Top